Words

Calling the Haiku Helpline ...

Nuance. Overtone.
Emphasis. Color. Degree.

A haiku seemed like a simple, straightforward approach. But I’m struggling with how to close, to make the point.

Perhaps …
Nuance. Overtone.
Emphasis. Color. Degree.
Clarity connects. 

Which is right. Your choice of words helps hone your point. Define and reinforce your intent. Minimize questions or doubt. 

Yet, there’s that whole bit about the context in which a message is received. Maybe it should read …
Nuance. Overtone.
Emphasis. Color. Degree.
Load words with meaning.

Because really, all we can do is put words out there for the reader to digest. Suggest, so that she can infer from her own experience … come to her own conclusions. Right?

But that feels a bit fatalistic. Real communication seems a bit random. What if, instead, …

Nuance. Overtone.
Emphasis. Color. Degree.
Give ideas a chance.

After all, our goal is to build understanding. Connect our intent with the context in which it’s received. 

What do you think? 

Please send me your suggestions.



Just Say What You Mean

Okay … I’ll admit it. I remember when Arthur Herzog’s groundbreaking book The B.S. Factor: The Theory and Technique of Faking it in America was published back in 1973.

As a fledgling Communications major, I found his rants against Executalk and other verbal misdirections fascinating.

“Words by the thousands have been affected and even undone" he claims. "At times it seems that the whole vocabulary is unraveling like a loosely knit sweater.”

So, it’s probably no surprise a headline about “Business Buzzwords I’d Like to Ban” would catch my eye.

(I could say would incentivize me to dive deeper. Or NOT.)

I wish I could say I’ve never used any of these. Unfortunately, I can’t. But I hope I’ll be less inclined to do so now.

Maybe you will be, too. 

What do you think?