Direct Marketing

Pitfalls of Email Personalization

Google personalized emails statistics and you’ll get a gazillion studies proving the effectiveness of personalized emails. Yes, yes, yes; personalized, tailored communications outperform generic communications. We can all agree on that.

But personalization (and the data management around it) isn’t magic. And don’t let anyone tell you it is!

Done poorly, personalization has the opposite intended effect. The sender looks like a buffoon who is trying to pull off a charade.

Take a look at this example. The merge of salutation data didn’t work, leaving me to feel like one of many “leads.” Wow. I feel so special.

IMG_2106.PNG

I wish I could say I’ve never had a personalization error happen in my campaigns, but I can’t. So I’m sharing some tips from our team on how to avoid everything from minor snafus to major debacles.

  1. Look at the raw data — If you’re importing into an email system, you need to look thoroughly at what’s going in. Seriously, look with a fine-toothed comb. Garbage in, garbage out, as they say. You might have a terrible blunder in row 1,256. Catch it now. Also avoid having anything colloquial or informal in your data. “Guy I met at 2019 conference” cannot be in a name field in your spreadsheet, however accurate it is!.

  2. Use an email rendering service such as Email on Acid or Litmus to view your email in a variety of browsers. These services can seem pricey — but worth every single penny. They will save yo ass.

  3. Don’t forget the preheader (also called the second subject line). It can live in your code and only appear front and center when it arrives in the inbox (cue scary music of doom). Find out where it is and make sure it has nothing outdated or embarrassing in it.

  4. Do a live deployment. Most people just use the “test” function when working on emails. You can actually deploy a campaign to five people to double-check that the data is pulling correctly. Better to find out now. Once you’re satisfied, duplicate that email and deploy to the masses without fear.

  5. Assume nothing. Our team works really hard to leave nothing to chance. If you utter the phrase, “Oh I’m sure it will be fine,” that right there is the kiss of death. You’ve sealed your fate! Check it — and check it again.

And if a mistake happens … and it will, just remember it’s a learning moment and something to be added to your ongoing checklist. Email marketing can be a beast. Those of us doing it are with ya.

May the email Gods be ever in your favor.

Are Your Communications Honoring Your Constituents’ Experience?

Effective-Communication-Skills. - Blog Image.jpg

Late last month, I attended the Mid-America Planned Giving Council’s Building Blocks Conference. A full house at the Kauffman Foundation, and the day did not disappoint. The first session of the day featured Karen Osborne, a crowd favorite for nonprofit audiences across the country. She captivated the audience with her presentation, “Getting to a Joyful, Inspired, Generous ‘Yes’ to Your Blended Solicitation.”

At one point, she asked the audience one of the biggest failures people make in listening to others. Being a little smug, I was expecting the answer “listening to respond” or something of the like.

But that wasn’t it. And her answer humbled me. She said one of the biggest failures in listening is immediately sharing a similar experience. A common one goes like this:

Pregnant Woman: “I’m going to be induced on Saturday night. I’m getting a little anxious.”
Other Woman: “I was induced, too. And the labor took 2,546 hours. Let me tell you about it.”

The reason this is a big fail? It doesn’t honor the other person’s experience. Instead, it pulls the attention from them to you.

It got to me thinking, though. How often does this happen in nonprofit messaging … that is, ignore the constituent’s experience? A LOT.

Here are some common ways communications, on screen or on paper, fall into this same trap.

Talking to longtime donors like they don’t know what your organization does. This is one of the most common ones I see. It usually involves pulling some well-written boilerplate from a brochure in a direct mail letter or email. Problem is, it comes off like you have no relationship.

Talking to major donors in a way that doesn’t honor their higher giving history. If someone has given $1,000, it’s odd to ask them for $15. Make simple changes in copy that tell your readers you know what they’ve done and inspire them to do more.

Talking to medical cause donors like they haven’t seen a disease firsthand. In most cases, there is a personal tie to this type of charitable giving. The copy needs to reflect what that is (if such data exists) or be written in a way that isn’t patronizing. “Imagine a world where XYZ happens … “ They don’t have to imagine … that is their world!

On the flip side, talking to donors as if they already know about a particular societal problem or challenge … and jumping right to your organization as the solution. Consider when a little background and education is needed. Define the problem. Then, platform for how you can solve it, with the reader’s help. This is critical in acquisition messaging.

In many cases, there are relatively simple fixes, sometimes just minor versioning, that can take a communications piece from offensive to effective. Think through your audiences. Imagine someone from each of those groups and review your communications through their eyes. Then, adjust as needed.